Cao Bang Bitter Tea: A Famous Trademark

3:26:23 PM | 8/7/2005

Cao Bang Bitter Tea: A Famous Trademark

 

The bitter tea, Khom tea in local dialect, was found in the forests of Thach An and Ha Lang districts (Cao Bang). In ancient times, the tea was exclusively reserved for Chinese kings and mandarins. In traditional medicine, the tea is used for the treatment of colds, headaches, eye, nose and throat inflammations, diarrhoea, and other ailments. In modern medical applications, it reduces cholesterol, blood tension, stress, infections and weight problems.

 

With favourable natural conditions for growth, Cao Bang can develop the tea and expand plantations. Drinking the tea, people receive the benefit of good health and medical treatment. The value of the tea has been confirmed by the research of Vietnam's Pharmaceutical Institute, Traditional Medicines Institute and Hanoi Pharmaceutical College. In 2000-2003, the Cao Bang Department of Science and Technology and Thai Nguyen Medicine College reaffirmed after a thorough study that the tea can be used against toxicity without side-effects on the kidneys or other medical treatment. Other research also proved that the tea can help cases of toxicity caused by insecticide or metal toxins.

 

Based on the success of the national research project on the bitter tea, Cao Bang Bitter Tea Company was established in early 2003 with the task of producing bitter tea for domestic and foreign markets. The production line is supplied by a Vietnam-Taiwan joint venture to ensure full safety.

 

           

The company markets several products such as tea bags, tea buds, Vuong (King) tea, and Tan (Guest) tea. Domestic sales have reached 250,000-300,000 boxes a year through dozens of agents nation-wide. After only two years, the trademark has become known throughout the country and the product has repeatedly won gold medals and certificates of high quality product status. In particular, in 2004, the tea won the Vietnam Golden Star prize.

 

           

The company has now partners in the EU, the US, Japan, and Australia. Mr. Doan Hai Trieu, Director of the company said that in coming years the company will expand the plantation and increase the production capacity to meet growing demand. Alongside the expansion of markets and diversification of products, the company will have to fight against imitation products to protect its trademark.

 

           

With its comparative edge and joint efforts of the workers, the company expects to export the tea, promoting the Vietnamese trademark in the world market.

 

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